The Lost Art of Conversation Can Help Save HigherEd ElevateU

The Lost Art of Conversation Can Help Save HigherEd
  • July 21st, 2020
  • elevate elevateio

Conversation is a lost art, replaced by endless talk. To converse is to share ideas and learn from one another in the process. It demands listening and talking equally.

 

Talk is one-way.  Most meetings are spent between talking thinking about what to talk about next.

 

A new podcast by Bay Path University explores relevant and often provocative topics in higher education, through the lens of some of the nation’s most innovative educators. The podcast, IngenioUs, was developed by Melissa Morriss-Olson, provost emerita at the Longmeadow university. Morriss-Olson is a Distinguished Professor of Higher Ed Leadership, and creator and director of the college’s new Center for Higher Education Leadership and Innovative Practices.

Guests have included Carol Leary, Bay Path president, Amer Ahmed, Interim Executive Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and Visiting Faculty at Dickinson College, and Lenore Rodicio, Executive Vice-President and Provost at Miami Dade College, the nation’s largest community college which recently announced all non-workforce programs and selected courses that are difficult to offer in a remote format will begin September online only and be reassessed September 27th.

 

Many universities have podcasts that involve higher ed leadership that other schools can benefit and join in on the conversation. In particular UC Berkley’s, “Berkeley Talks: How higher ed is transforming during the pandemic” where Carol Christ, UC chancellor mentions a faculty member quoting Lord of the Rings. “He said, this is Frodo, “I wish it need not have happened in my time.” “So do I,” said Gandalf. “And so do all who live to see such times, but that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time has given us.” That keeps echoing in my mind.”

 

Stanford University’s podcast episode, “Schools In: COVID-19 and the future of higher education”, co-hosted by Stanford Graduate School of Education Dean Dan Schwartz and Senior Lecturer Denise Pope was joined by Mitchell Stevens, an associate professor at GSE who proclaimed, “the presumption that face-to-face instruction is always superior to digitally mediated forms is not going to be sustainable, regardless of when the pandemic ends. Students who attend residential universities find much of the value of that time in the full-tilt, wraparound, 24/7 experience, Stevens says. But “only about a third of conventional-age undergraduates experience that kind of academic life world,” he says. “And the reason it’s only a third is because that mode of delivery is just spectacularly expensive.”

 

And then if you are ready to listen with an open mind and strong heart, there is “The Prof G Show with Scott Galloway“, NYU Stern School of Business professor, author, and entrepreneur with episodes that are thought-provoking, eye-opening, and bold. Many of the episodes touch on the state of higher education from a business standpoint as much as an educational point of view.

 

Podcasts are just one of the ways higher education can benefit from having conversations. Online group discussions with professors across the nations and student focus groups can accelerate and close the gap between in-classroom instruction and online learning.

The Lost Art of Conversation Can Help Save HigherEd

Conversation is a lost art, replaced by endless talk. To converse is to share ideas and learn from one another in the process. It demands listening and talking equally.

 

Talk is one-way.  Most meetings are spent between talking thinking about what to talk about next.

 

A new podcast by Bay Path University explores relevant and often provocative topics in higher education, through the lens of some of the nation’s most innovative educators. The podcast, IngenioUs, was developed by Melissa Morriss-Olson, provost emerita at the Longmeadow university. Morriss-Olson is a Distinguished Professor of Higher Ed Leadership, and creator and director of the college’s new Center for Higher Education Leadership and Innovative Practices.

Guests have included Carol Leary, Bay Path president, Amer Ahmed, Interim Executive Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and Visiting Faculty at Dickinson College, and Lenore Rodicio, Executive Vice-President and Provost at Miami Dade College, the nation’s largest community college which recently announced all non-workforce programs and selected courses that are difficult to offer in a remote format will begin September online only and be reassessed September 27th.

 

Many universities have podcasts that involve higher ed leadership that other schools can benefit and join in on the conversation. In particular UC Berkley’s, “Berkeley Talks: How higher ed is transforming during the pandemic” where Carol Christ, UC chancellor mentions a faculty member quoting Lord of the Rings. “He said, this is Frodo, “I wish it need not have happened in my time.” “So do I,” said Gandalf. “And so do all who live to see such times, but that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time has given us.” That keeps echoing in my mind.”

 

Stanford University’s podcast episode, “Schools In: COVID-19 and the future of higher education”, co-hosted by Stanford Graduate School of Education Dean Dan Schwartz and Senior Lecturer Denise Pope was joined by Mitchell Stevens, an associate professor at GSE who proclaimed, “the presumption that face-to-face instruction is always superior to digitally mediated forms is not going to be sustainable, regardless of when the pandemic ends. Students who attend residential universities find much of the value of that time in the full-tilt, wraparound, 24/7 experience, Stevens says. But “only about a third of conventional-age undergraduates experience that kind of academic life world,” he says. “And the reason it’s only a third is because that mode of delivery is just spectacularly expensive.”

 

And then if you are ready to listen with an open mind and strong heart, there is “The Prof G Show with Scott Galloway“, NYU Stern School of Business professor, author, and entrepreneur with episodes that are thought-provoking, eye-opening, and bold. Many of the episodes touch on the state of higher education from a business standpoint as much as an educational point of view.

 

Podcasts are just one of the ways higher education can benefit from having conversations. Online group discussions with professors across the nations and student focus groups can accelerate and close the gap between in-classroom instruction and online learning.

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